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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the official count from the artment of energy had 3.6en million customers across 11 states still without power. getting around in fected areas remains a challenge. the new york subway system remains shut down in lower manhattan. commuter rail systems in the new york suburbs are on limited i service, as are new york's three large airports. >> tom: energylso remains a concern. late today the department of energy announced it will release emergency heating oil supplies to relieve a supply crunch due to sandy. meantime, many gasoline stations in the new york-nemajersey area- have closed because they have run out of gas or don't have electricity to get it out of the pump. erika miller reports >> reporter: six hours. that's how long drivers had to wait to fill up at this manhattan station. >> i got here at 6:00 am. >> reporter: the line stretched over 30 city blocks, but at least drivers could get gas. it's estimated that at least half of all staons in the metropolitan area are closed. s mount olive new jersey, some o tried making the best of a bad situation butong waits are still bt fun. >> it's s
. >> tom: that's in petroleum energy. you also like utility energy, xcel energy, based in the land of 10,000 lakes in minnesota classic, isn't it hre? >> that's ri ht. it's at. classic dividend. the dividend return is over 4%. it operates in the upper midwest, t good regulatoryod bo. so far they seem to be having a rather straightforward relationship with the regulators, and their economy is doing pretty well. >> tom: that's always important with the regulated energy utility companies you also like dow chemical which got hit this week in part because of its competitor did you popt having a less-than-exprcted outlook and she also announced some job cuts. it's been trending lower. any concern here? >> i'm not truly concernect abot it. no, we reached a point where laying off people, erfortunatelying is what happens when you ach a slow-down in growth, and the dow is spread arou globally with mod etchemicals primarily. so if you think that the world is going to pick up a little of momentum here or there gradually, it's a good oneto buy when it's weak, and it certainly hasn't been too strong l
a "battleground dispatch" from the critical state of ohio, examining how the auto bailout and energy boom are weighing on voter's minds. >> we've had a lot of positive economic news over the last couple of months. is it too close to the election to really make an impacon people's votes? or are people still kind of weighing the economic realities of the country and of the state? >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> onown: and we close with ndthor louise erdrich on the crafting of her new novel, dealing with life-altering violence for one native american family. to talk to me. and i knew once i had written into this, when i got to the words, where is your mother, i knew that thisas the book. >> woodruff: that's all aheadn o tonight's newshour. c2 >> jor fuing for the pbs newshour has been provided by:n ♪  ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedited to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support
of nextera energy. >> susie: hurricane sandy has created an energy shock in the northeast, gas pumps aren't working, supplies are tight, and where there is fuel, there are long lines; reminiscent of the 1970's gas shortage. with two jor gasoline refineries in the northeast region still shut down, capacity is off 10%. and with spotty power,so especially in parts of new jersey, gas pumps don't work, so many gas stations are closed to drivers, and people looking tod fu their generators. >> tom: airli ts, trucking companies and railroads are all working to untangle the mess left in sandy's wake. bridges into manhattan are now open again, but not all the traffic tunnels have re-opened, and the subway remains closed.ck airports are re-opening but getting the northeast moving again faces a long road ahead. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: at sandy's peak, flooding covered the runways at new york's laguardia airport. as the waters recede, f.a.a. tenicians are repairing landing lights and navigational systems. and airlines hope ts y will be able to offer limited service at laguardia tomorrow. in
for the rest of the year. america's biggest publicly traded energy company, exxon mobil, saw production fall to its lowest level in three years last quarter. still, earnings per share were stronger than anticipated, helped by profits doubling i its refining business. but production fell more than expected.ng the company explained part of the drop was due moving drilling rigs from going after low price natural gas to higher margin oil. shares were up a fraction, rising a half a percent. volume was stronger than usual. the stock is up 20% in the past year. the biggest retailer was the biggest drag on the dow with the market trying to gauge sandy'sg impact on business at walmart. the stock fell 2.1%. 294 wal-mart facilities were closed at one point during hurricane sandy, thanks to mandatory evacuations, safety concerns, and power outages. after the close, the focus was on starbucks. consumers continue buying their coffee and lattes. earnings were 46 cents per share. that's a penny more than estimates. ve aes and profit margins were up by double digits each. shares were up 1.6% during the regu
on everything from economic growth to energy prices. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."!e as we go on the air tonight, hurricane sandy is ready to make landfall in the u.s., already it's an historic storm, with historic preparations. stock markets closed. and coast lines evacuated with tens of millions of people sitting in the forecast path of the massive storm. sandy is a huge storm expected to come ashore in southern new jersey. but the hurricane force winds have been battering the eastern seaboard for hours. those winds extend out 175 miles from the center of the storm. those winds are pushing the atlantic ocean up and over many coast-lin.. from rhode island, south to the jersey shore. coastal flooding is a significant risk thanks to the storm surge, potentially reaching 11 feet in new york harbor. battery park on the tip of manhattan is under a mandatory evacuation, as waves already have topped the sea wall. low lying areas are at substantial risk of flood water including the wall street area, especially if the worst of the surge hits during high tide tonight, at 9pm eastern time. that th
about where we were going to get energy. r but we didn't talk about how we were going to regulate the uses of the energy and the getting of the energy. and we didn't talk about the effects of the ways we would get it on either the environment or, more broadlyon the globe. g >> nonetheless, did the debates matter? do you think they've had an impact on the campaign? >> yes, a what we, what we saw weross the debates is what we expected to see. we saw learning about those issues that weraddressed. more accurate placemenadof candemdates on the areas in whih they differ. whaowe didn't see is more accurate placement on areas that they're similar because the news never stresses areas in which they're similar. but nonethweess, we've seen learning across the debates in our annenberg survey. when t my sense is tha there is no penalty for lying or as jonathan swift says in the last part of "gulliver's", for saying the thing that is not soh that the things one learns about what people say are completely irrelevant. governor romney has chang his position on just about everything throughout his
on energy and the environment at the american enterprise institute, a conservative think tank. gentlemen, we heard mayor bloomberg, governor cuomo sort of wrestling outloud with making these choices. knowing what e know does philadelphia, does boston, does new york have to use a changed municipal math to run its daily affairs because of threats of these kinds of things? joe kromm? >> well, i think as governor cuomo said, it'sro a new normal but we have old infrastructure. i think if f you listen to client scientists -- if we had listened to climate sientists who worned, no could flood like this, that storm surges were going to increase as the sea levels rose because of gobel warming and because of more intense storms we might have prevented it. now i think we need to listen to climate scientists who are warning that sea levels could rise, two feet-- as you heard-- by the middle of the century but three, four, five and six feet by the end of the century. so our choices are twofold. we should reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we're on the low end of future warming estimates and secondly we've
,onsolidated edison, pepco, ppl andda first energy. travis miller covers them a for morningstar. travis, how will these companies pay for the repair job they're facing ahead of them? >> there's no question that utilities are in for a huge bill from this. and really, the last two years they've been hit multiple times with large rep pair bills and outages. if you're looking for utilities that come from repair costs they have to make, and putteding up flyers to bring back the power plants online, but also the lost revenue they have when utiltd customers are out of power and can't pay their bills because the system is out. >> tom: travis, do they have the operating cash flow to pay for these? are they going to have to borrow mony and issue bonds? >> >> we think the utilities, are well capitalized and have plenty of cash. in the scheme of things, these are multibillion companies, and you're probably talking about upwards of a billion dollars, our estimate for the bill, and at least for new york and new jersey. >> tom: you think they're in good financial shape to be able to withstand that without
of the country. >> energy time, and political capital to pass legislation state after state to make it more difficult to vote, primarily for latinos. and third they don't campaign in their neighborhoods or their community t they don't ask for their vote, and finally mitt romneynd his unguarded moment at bocand raton in his 47 percent speech taped without his knowledge says that he would be better off if he could run as a latino because his father was born in mexico. i mean if you are a 19 or 20-year-old latino this isis going to cost your support for the republican party as a generation. they ignored george w. bush, jeb bush, his brother who has been quite enlightened on the subject and said you cannot, in this country, continue to win only with white people's votes. and i just, i think that the enlightened voices i heard in iowa, in e the piece, you know, i hope the republicans heed them. because we are looking at an election right now where barack obama will probably get over 70% of latino vote. >> woodruff: so a net negative for the republicans? >> oh, yeah, increasingly. and i agree wit
: mitt wasn't much for the academics. the school yearbook shows where he put his energy. >> romy at cy nbrook was a belonger. he wasn't a good athlete, but hw was the manager of the hockey team, he was on the cross- country team, he was a cheerleader. he was very active in everything he could be. he was part of the place very deeply. >> narrator: during that time, mitt's dad dided to leave business and head into politicsd michigan was a powerful democratic stronghold, but george romney had a maverick streak. he ran as a liberal-to-moderate republican. and mitt watched as he won. >> michigan can light the authentic path to a fuller and higher expression of freedom in america. thank you very much. rowd ches) >> is a bit singg how invo he in george political activities from a fairly yng age.ng >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his fat
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)